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June 18, 2019

Hello Friend,

I'm convinced that all the preservatives, pesticides and sugar put into our foods have had a horrible effect on our memories.

Growing up I knew few older people with Alzheimer's or Dementia. Now I don't know a family who isn't affected.

In fact new studies show someone in the world develops dementia every 3 seconds. There were an estimated 46.8 million people worldwide living with dementia in 2015 and this number grew to 50 million people in 2017.

By 2030 it is estimated 75 million people will be afflicted.

What are we to do? We've all heard do a crossword puzzle. Well that is good but here are 10 things you can do RIGHT NOW to improve your memory.

Be Well,
Anisa

As always please reply with your thoughts and comments.

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1. Make over your meals...

As I mentioned I believe food is so much at the root of our issues.

There has been much said on the health benefits of a Mediterranean diet. A diet that is heavy on fish, vegetables, whole grains and daily servings of nuts and olive oil.

Studies show it does your memory some good, too. A 2015 study published in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine found that a Mediterranean diet appears to reduce age-related cognitive declines.

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2. Meditate daily...

Meditation has been linked to all sorts of health benefits, from lower blood pressure to improved moods.

It also seems to help with memory. One study found that as few as four days of mindfulness meditation significantly improves working memory and functioning of the brain.

It's also easy and ANYONE can do it! Visit here for a guide to getting started.

3. Control your blood pressure...

If your blood pressure is high it can cause minor memory issues. Little things like remembering where you left the car keys or a person's name.

High blood pressure can reduce the flow of blood to the brain and impact memory functions. What's more, high blood pressure during midlife could mean cognitive delays later.

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4. Eat berries...

Berries are one of several foods that appear to promote good memory. In particular, flavonoid-rich berries like strawberries and blueberries seem to guard against declining memory in women, according to results of a study by Harvard researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital.

5. Quit smoking...

As Seen TV BSYou smoker's out there, don't kill the messenger for this one! A study in the U.K. found that smoking caused people to lose some of their everyday memory.

The good news? It can be restored by quitting.

6. Drink your water...

It's not just what you eat that can affect your memory. A 2016 study found that being even slightly dehydrated was associated with poorer memory and attention. While drinking water improved memory and focused attention.

7. Laugh a little...

Countless studies have shown you'll be happier if you look at the lighter side of life, and your memory might benefit too.

A study out of Loma Linda University in California found older, healthy adults who watched a funny video for 20 minutes scored better on a memory test than those who just sat calmly for 20 minutes.

8. Chew gum...

Science says chewing gum can give your concentration and memory a boost. Researchers theorize that it could be because it increases blood flow to the brain.

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9. Pour a glass of wine...

Admit it, this might be your favorite tip! And cheers to the researchers at the University of Exeter in the U.K. who found people who had an alcoholic drink after studying a word-learning task had better recall than those who skipped the drink.

Of course, if you don't stop at one drink, you could find the opposite is true. Remember: Moderation is the magic word when it comes to alcohol.

10. Listen to music...

You've probably heard of the “Mozart effect,” a concept introduced in 1993 after a study found students who listened to Mozart's Sonata for Two Pianos for 10 minutes did better on tests than those who spent 10 minutes in silence or doing relaxation exercises.

Since then, a number of studies have linked music to brain function and worked to explain how certain songs can evoke memories. However, if you really want to make music work for your mind, take it to the next level and learn to play an instrument as well.