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Looking Good - August 24, 2016

*-- Wash Your Hair the Right Way --*

You may do it every day, but do you really know how to wash your hair the right way? Follow these tips below to get the proper wash!

1. Start with a rinse.

Just like your laundry needs a rinse cycle before you add detergent, hair should be thoroughly wet before you add your shampoo.

2. If you have long hair, condition first.

Yes, really! If you have hair beneath the shoulders, protect fragile ends from drying out and further damage by running a small amount of conditioner through them and lightly rinsing, before any shampooing. This will not only keep ends healthy, it will fill any holes in the cuticle with moisture, making it smoother and boosting shine.



3. Lather up - but only at the scalp.

You only need to shampoo the hair at the scalp, particularly at the nape. The best way to lather up is from roots to ends. The hair closest to the scalp is the youngest and will inevitably be the oiliest, while the end of the hair is the oldest and usually driest, most fragile part of the hair. Don't use more shampoo than you need; both Saviano and White say that a quarter-sized amount of shampoo is enough. If your hair is particularly long or thick, go ahead and double that.

4. Be gentle!

Friction can permanently damage your hair's cuticle, leading to breakage and frizz. Think about washing your hair like you hand wash your delicates - very carefully.

5. Don't rinse and repeat.

Despite what the instructions on the back of your shampoo bottle may say, there's no need to wash your hair twice.



6. Add conditioner from the mid-lengths to the tips.

After you've rinsed out your shampoo, squeeze some of the water out of the hair before you put in the conditioner. The longer the conditioner stays on your hair, the better it absorbs. Don't put conditioner at the roots of your hair; the natural oil from your scalp is more concentrated there.

7. Finish with a cold water rinse.

"Cold water will shut the cuticle tight, sealing the shingle-like outer layer, which will cause it to reflect the most light and give off the most shine," says White.

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